The history of CQB

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The history of CQB

Post by Admin » Mon Oct 31, 2011 11:14 am

Where and when did it all start? The start to the modern tactics in use today?
I believe that the CWR wing at SAS22 in the seventies have a lot of credit in this matter!
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Tactical education and motivation.training info for the soldier that wish to learn the art of CQB.

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Re: The history of CQB

Post by jimothy_183 » Mon Oct 31, 2011 12:16 pm

One of the articles in the articles forum states that the Israelis were the ones that came up with the modern CQB tactics as we know it.

http://www.slideshare.net/Mewthom/high-risk-warrant-ex

EDIT:

I believe that CQB tactics and in fact all infantry tactics as a whole has undergone a continuous evolution. You can trace these tactics back to at least WWII.
semper acer , semper velox , semper trux , semper promptus

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Re: The history of CQB

Post by Ryan » Wed Nov 02, 2011 5:51 am

Modern CQB methods I'd agree with as they've been fighting terrorism in predominantly close quarter battles against an unconventional threat for a long time, and have some of the best CT/CQB units out there. They had to mix with many entry techniques due to the type of warfare they attend with. I think fighting an unknown threat has really improved how we look upon it too, as comparison to Army v Army.

I'd agree with Jimothy on WW2 plus, it was a time of great development. WW1 I'd be less agreeable about, it was close combat during many battles but not organised urban and close combat tactics which really worked and had lee-way, sure it helped bind the thought process of how we looked upon it and developed from those experienced in WW1. I suppose technology, weaponary and such really developed that for WW2+ (and during). And I suppose the war was that long and really war-oriented with society (as all World Wars are) that it had to be improved. And now in different threatres with different threats it is still being developed... and still has a long way to go.
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"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

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Re: The history of CQB

Post by ari-free » Wed Dec 14, 2011 7:49 pm

The technique that most people associate with cqb today can be traced here:
"Replace Battle Drill 6" by CPT Drew Meyerowich
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/ ... ldrill.htm
"In this article, I will present a combat proven technique that, in my opinion, should replace the current Battle Drill 6. I was fortunate to have a truly professional squad leader from 3rdRanger Battalion, part of Task Force Ranger, bring his squad to my company area in Mogadishu and teach us their method for clearing rooms. My First Sergeant and I then took their technique a step further and developed a room-clearing drill and a three-day training plan to teach it to every man in the company. This drill applies not only to limited operations typical in peacekeeping, but also to operations as intense and hostile as those seen by my unit and the members of Task Force Ranger on 3-4 October 1993. "

The original Battle drill 6 can be found here. First man went right into the middle of the room.
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/ ... ch4.htm#d6

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Re: The history of CQB

Post by Ryan » Wed Jun 20, 2012 11:02 am

"The CQC (as close combat, force on force) exists since the man takes a weapon. The beginnings of the CQB (limited environment), his bases, I think that begin in the places where it was fighting house-to-house. Perhaps Stalingrad, perhaps before: the towns of Poland, Holland, Belgium.... I think the WW2 initiated the urban combat, not the WW1." From Facebook.

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CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

Dramatikk

Re: The history of CQB

Post by Dramatikk » Sun Jul 29, 2012 10:28 pm

The Originators of CQB:

William Ewart Fairbairn (1885-1960) was a British soldier, police officer, and exponent of hand-to-hand combat method, Close Combat, for the Shanghai police between the World Wars, and allied special forces in World War II. He developed his own fighting system known as Defendu, as well as other weapons tactics. Notably, this included innovative pistol shooting techniques and the development of the Fairbairn-Sykes fighting knife.

He served with the Royal Marine Light Infantry starting in 1901, and joined the Shanghai Municipal Police (SMP) in 1907. During World War II, he was recruited by the British Secret Service as an Army officer; together with Sykes he was commissioned on the General List in 1941. He trained UK, US and Canadian Commando forces, along with Ranger candidates in close-combat, pistol-shooting, and knife-fighting techniques.

Fairbairn eventually rose to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel by the end of World War II, and received the U.S. Legion of Merit at the specific request of "Wild Bill" Donovan, founder of the U.S. O.S.S.

After joining the SMP, he studied Jiu-Jutsu and then Chinese martial arts, developed his own fighting system - Defendu - and taught it to members of that police force in order to reduce officer fatalities. Fairbairn drew heavily on Chinese martial arts, which he simplified and tailored to the needs of training police in one of the most crime ridden cities in the world, with its history of opium trade, rebellion, and Triad gangsters. He described this system as primarily based on his personal experience, which according to police records included some 600 non-training fights, by his retirement at age 55 from the position of Assistant Commissioner in 1940.

Together with Eric A. Sykes he developed innovative pistol shooting techniques and handgun specifications for the SMP which were later disseminated through their book Shooting To Live With The One-Hand Gun (1942), along with various other police innovations such as riot batons, armored 'Mauser-proof' vests, and other equipment.

Colonel Rex Applegate (1914 - 1998) worked in the Office of Strategic Services where he trained allied special forces in close-quarter combat during World War II.

In 1943 he wrote Kill or Get Killed, still considered the classic textbook of Western-style hand-to-hand combat. The updated 1976 edition of Kill or Get Killed was also published by the US Marine Corps as Fleet Marine Force Reference Publication 12-80. From the foreword:
  • - "Fleet Marine Force Reference Publication (FMFRP) 12-80, Kill or Get Killed, is published to ensure the retention and dissemination of useful information which is not intended to become doctrine or to be published in Fleet Marine Force manuals."

    - "This reference publication was written in 1976 by Lieutenant Colonel Rex Applegate, USA (Ret), with the help of the Combat Section, Military Intelligence Training Center, Camp Ritchie Maryland. At last there is one volume which speaks to the subjects of unarmed combat (offensive and defensive), combat use of weapons, disarming the enemy, handling of prisoners, the handle of mob/crowd disobedience, the use of chemicals in such situations, and how to establish a professional riot control unit."
Applegate developed the techniques outlined in the book during his work with William E. Fairbairn, who had previously developed his techniques while working for the Shanghai Municipal Police from 1907 to 1940. Applegate's techniques are heavily based on Fairbairn's Defendu, and enhanced with feedback from the OSS operatives who put his techniques into action in World War II.

Applegate also co-wrote The Close-Combat Files of Colonel Rex Applegate with Chuck Melson.

Eric Anthony Sykes (5 February 1883-12 May 1945), born Eric Anthony Schwabe, is most famous for his work with William E. Fairbairn in the development of the eponymous Fairbairn-Sykes fighting knife and modern English Close Quarters Battle, during World War II. First working with an import/export company selling weapons in Asia, he joined the Shanghai Municipal Police (SMP) volunteer Specials as an inspector in the 1920's. It was with the SMP that Sykes met Fairbairn, and began their famous professional association.

Matt Larsen
is an American CQB instructor known as "The Father of Modern CQB" for his complete rewrite of the United States Army's CQB doctrine and establishing the US Army CQB School. He has been credited with pushing Hoplology, the scientific and academic study of combative behavior, into the modern era.

Larsen enlisted in the United States Marine Corps as an infantryman in 1984. He was soon stationed overseas in Tokyo Japan with the Marine barracks at Naval Air Facility Atsugi. During this time Larsen began training in the martial arts, with Judo, Shotokan Karate and boxing. He continued his training in martial arts when he was transferred to Okinawa with the 3rd Battalion 5th Marine Regiment, training in Sh?bayashi Sh?rin-ry? with Eizo Shimabukuro and continuing his judo training and also trained Kali in the Philippines. After several years as a Marine, he reenlisted in the United States Army, working his way into the 75th Ranger Regiment, where he would stay for the next 14 years.

He soon found himself as the non-commissioned officer in charge (NCOIC) of CQB and Close Quarters Battle (CQB) training for the 2nd Ranger Battalion, where he took the training he received, achieving black belts in several martial arts, and merged them into a single, effective, fighting style. As the program grew more elaborate, he became the NCOIC of CQB and CQB training for the entire 75th Ranger Regiment.

With his service in the Ranger Regiment, he had become established as the United States Army's CQB subject matter expert. When the opportunity to shape the Army's CQB program came, he transferred to the Ranger Training Brigade, which was in charge of developing the CQB doctrine at the time. During this time, he refined his training methods and began putting together a comprehensive training manual. Larsen was asked to move to the 11th Infantry Regiment to design a CQB instructor training course for their cadre. As the 11th Infantry Regiment would soon have a more rigorous training regimen, taught by the Army's subject matter expert on CQB, the proponency for CQB doctrine moved with him.

His ideas were well received at the 11th Infantry Regiment and he found himself with an old warehouse that he began transforming into a CQB training facility. Within a short time, the school had become successful enough that units from around the Army began sending their personnel. Several new courses had to be developed in order to continue teaching beyond the initial course, with the idea of building programs within these units. Eventually the school was recognized by the Army as the US Army CQB School. In 2002, the training manual that he had been working on since his time with the Ranger Training Brigade was published by the Army as Field Manual 3-25.150 (CQB).

After retiring from the Army, Larsen spent several months working as a private contractor in Afghanistan and Iraq before being rehired by the Army as a civilian employee. He is now the Director of the Modern Army CQB Program (MACP) which he created and the Commandant of the US Army CQB School, (USACS) which he founded at Fort Benning Georgia. In 2007 he helped the United States Army Special Forces Qualification Course revamp their entire CQB curriculum and was an advisor to the US Air Force, who adopted his program in early 2008. In 2008 and 2009 Larsen rewrote the US Army Survival Handbook and the U.S. Military Pocket Survival Guide: Plus Evasion & Recovery for the publisher Lyons Press.

Dennis Martin
started training in Karate in 1965. In 1970 he started working with Terry O'Neill on the door of a Liverpool nightclub. In 1973 he went to Japan and Okinawa to train in Goju-ryu Karate for 6 months. On returning to England in October 73 he was asked to be a bodyguard at the Miss World Contest, specifically providing protection for Miss Israel. This led him to further training and work in the field of VIP Protection. He has worked as a team leader and operator on VIP protection tasks for several Royal families and Diplomatic entities.

In 1985 he formed CQB Services, a training company, and offered the first ever commercial close-protection training course in the UK. Together with Lofty Wiseman, he trained bodyguards from Europe, Australia, USA and Africa.

Based on the methods taught to the bodyguards, he started teaching Close Quarter Battle [CQB] techniques to security, police and civilian personnel. For self-protection, rather than the traditional martial art of Karate, he developed an efficient, practical curriculum of Combatives based on his experience on Liverpool nightclub doors.

Acording to Geoff Thompson "Dennis Martin is the most credible instructor of real self-defence in the world today."

His book "Working with Warriors" was published in 2008.
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Kind regards, Dramatikk. :)

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Re: The history of CQB

Post by Ryan » Sun Aug 26, 2012 2:47 am

"The History and Origins of European Military Close Combat

It is true that every early civilization had methods of fighting but the history outlined here is of a structured warlike military nature. Ancient Egyptians practiced close combat over 6000 years ago. The Celts records revealed their practices of close combat date back a century before Bhodidharma regarded as the founder of kung fu. Competitive forms of deadly combat were being contested at the ancient Olympics as early as 688 BC. Training at this point in time was structured and evidence can be found of ancient Celtic engravings and etchings showing combat training in various armed and unarmed practices as well as performance enhancing exercises. Christianity destroyed much of the records of ancient European close combat in belief that it was non-Christian. The ancient Europeans had the ultimate test of effectiveness in life or death competitive battles. Swords being utilized in combat had been depicted in detailed drawings as early as 1200 BC. For over 300 years the Roman Empire conducted Gladialanical combat where combatants would kill or be killed.

It was the advance of weaponry they eventually saw the decline of many unarmed practices. European close combat has largely been forgotten due to secrecy it was surrounded by through history. Ancient artifacts like challis's and sword scabbards dated back to the fourth century BC and depict soldiers practicing close combat. Greek Pankration dates back to the first Olympics in the seventh century BC.

The Galation Celts were employed in early close combat skills to combat the Greeks as they fought their way through Greece into Anatolia. Many Greek soldiers who trained in early close combat and fought Galations were Celtic mercenaries. When Alexandra the Great's Empire extended to India the considered birthplace of eastern martial arts his soldiers left behind the basics for the development of the eastern martial arts. These early European warring factions practiced every detail of close combat as their lives depended upon the skills and training. The early Europeans produced countless weapons to supersede enemy weaponry and fighting skills.

British Captain William Fairbairn considered the grandfather of European modern military close combat was proficient and well versed in the early European methods of military close combat and combined with his US counterpart Colonel Rex Applegate they were given the responsibility by their prospective governments to learn all they could of fighting methods of the world both enemy and allied.

Fairbairn's role was to analyse the methods and practices from the late 18 hundreds onwards and as such he became well versed and proficient in many Eastern systems giving him a vast knowledge in the mastery of fighting arts of the world. This insured his programmes; practices and principles were the best for real combat. It was with this vast wealth of knowledge that Fairbairn, Sykes and Applegate trained the most elite operatives of the Second World War.

With military close combat's history dating back to the ancient Europeans and the Celtic warriors through to the great wars and all conflicts until the present, military close combat has a history second to none of success in conquering all other enemy fighting systems and is a secret fighting system in its own right.

The work of the evolutionary pioneers is being continued today by Geoff Todd and his allied expert colleagues."

-- http://www.toddgroup.com/military-close ... story.html ...

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It's quite interesting that we still use the shield, we still get on line formation and so on.
Anyways... Enjoy!
CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

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Re: The history of CQB

Post by Ryan » Sun Aug 04, 2013 1:40 am

CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

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